Training

Gear Review: Combat Corner HMIT 10 oz Competition Boxing Gloves

by Drew Winkler

BASIC FACTS

Weight: 10 Oz’s

Colors: Blue and red

Material: 100% premium Cowhide Leather

Closure: Velcro

Handmade in Thailand (HMIT)

Retail price: $109.99

THE MANUFACTURER

Combat Corner was founded in 2007 by former professional MMA fighter Dan LaSavage. Since then, it has become one of the top manufacturers in martial arts equipment, sponsoring the likes of Jeremy Stephens, Ricardo Lamas, and Ben Askren. They take great pride in the durability of their products, using only the finest raw materials to ensure lasting quality.

APPEARANCE

The CC Competition boxing gloves are only sold in blue and red, providing few choices. As for the color distribution, it varies depending on what part of the glove you’re looking at. For example, on the blue pair, the trimming is lighter than on other parts of the glove. This might bother some, but I personally enjoy the contrast. That being said, it’s only a minor difference. Aside from the trimmings and the top part of the glove, the rest is dark black leather, which allows the blue to really pop. On the thumb is a white insignia with an outline of Thailand and a caption reading, “Hand Made in Thailand” and beneath that, “Premium Quality.” The strap also reminds the customer of the quality and origin of these gloves as it features a similar insignia and a Combat Corner in gold stitching. In short, aside from a few distinguishing features, these gloves have a pleasantly simple appearance.

MATERIALS: 9/10

They’re made from 100% cowhide leather and multi-layered foams. The toughness of the leather makes them highly resistant to scratches and other kinds of superficial damage. As for the foam inserts, they are extremely durable and excellent at absorbing tough blows. You’ll typically want to avoid using competition gloves for bag-work as this particular activity tends to cause the greatest amount of wear and tear. But the combination of cowhide leather and multi-layered foam inserts makes them tougher and better suited for bag work than your usual pair of competition gloves.

CRAFTSMANSHIP: 9/10

Both the grip bar and outside padding on these are accentuated, even more so than on some 12 and 14oz gloves. This provides greater protection while punching and in situations where you’re forced to take kicks on the gloves. This makes sense considering they were designed with competition in mind, where the risk of injury is always heightened. So in terms of protection, these gloves score high. Another thing I noticed is that its Velcro surface extends under the wrist, providing a tighter fit. This feature makes these gloves accessible to people with varying wrist sizes. One drawback is that it tends to leave a lot of exposed Velcro, and since Velcro is a very coarse material, this can cause your opponent or training partner rug-burn when clinch fighting.

COMFORT/USE: 9/10

Initially, these gloves were extremely tight and provided little to no wiggle room. This made it harder to open and close my hands while wearing them, making the following tasks more difficult: closing your fists at the end of punches, spreading your hands when throwing elbows, navigating the clinch, and lastly, catching and parrying kicks. All of these require the ability to open and close your hands with ease. Thus, the initial tightness of the gloves was an inconvenience. That being said, this became less of a problem with time and continued use. Eventually, the foam inserts began to soften, the leather stretched a bit, and the gloves themselves gained a looser and more comfortable feel. In other words, the comfortability of these gloves really depends on how often they’re used.

CONCLUSION: 9/10

Combat Corner’s 10oz competition gloves were clearly designed with efficiency in mind. The materials used to construct these gloves are incredibly durable, providing lasting quality and continued protection over time. The only drawback to this is that they’re initially very stiff, and, in comparison to other gloves, take longer to break in. But after a few months of consistent use, maximum comfort is added to their overall quality.

Score: 9/10

The Paleo Diet for Fighters

– by James Gregory –

James is the author of Paleo for Fighters

I hesitated to use the word “diet” in the title. US society has bastardized it to the point that it conjures up nothing but the unpleasant: pain, struggle and impossibility. I hesitated even more because it represents a special kind of pain for fighters. “Dieting” is feeling constantly hungry, eating flavorless, fatless chicken breasts, microwaved broccoli and maybe some oatmeal for weeks on end and clawing your way through training camp until you’ve malnourished yourself enough to make weight, fight, and then go on a donuts-fried-chicken-greasy-Chinese-food-tacos-and-soda-and-MOARDONUTS!!! bender until it’s time to roust yourself from your food coma and get back into the gym before you’re 25 pounds over your fight weight—typically a week. So, not that. “Diet” in the sense of just the foods that we eat.

If you read my last article, “Why Fighting Solves Everything,” you’ll know that Muay Thai was part of a change to a healthy lifestyle that helped me overcome an alcohol and cocaine addiction, a change that was truly life-saving. Part of this change, in addition to not dumping poison in my body, was a mission to find exactly what I should put in it. After having nearly killed myself, I really wanted to know what it felt like to be truly healthy.

When I started training, I ate what I at the time, and I think most people in general, would consider healthy: mostly whole foods, a good amount of whole grains, not a lot of junk, but some amount of processed sugar, including sports drinks. I weighed around 180-185lbs at 5’7” and trained as much as I do now, 4–6 days a week. Obviously, I don’t have to tell anyone reading this that Muay Thai is good exercise, so it wasn’t like I wasn’t putting the time in at the gym.

I just felt like there was something missing, something I wasn’t doing right, something that could get me leaner. I’ll fully admit, in addition to wanting to feel and be healthy, I wanted to look better, wanted a six pack. I think vanity can be a natural motivator for anyone, and provided it does not become excessive, possibly a healthy one.

At the time, I trained with a doctoral candidate in paleontology at the University of Pennsylvania. She was the one who convinced me to give paleo eating a go. I was fortunate in the fact that she was a real-life paleontologist, but it wasn’t just that. Emma was (and is) a good example of the benefits of paleo eating: healthy, energetic and lean. This is also the exact combination of qualities you also want as a fighter—the whole idea is to be as lean as possible while maintaining enough energy to train and fight well, lean and strong.

After around three weeks to a month of paleo eating, I got what I had been looking for. I dropped 15-20 pounds, all fat. I kept all of my muscle, had more strength, more energy to train. I recovered faster, my moods were more even, and I started to just get more done and in a better way than before. I evened out at around 165lbs, pretty much what I walk around at now, and have fought at 147 and 155lbs. Read More

Why Fighting Solves Everything

– by James Gregory –

James is the author of Paleo for Fighters

There’s a popular t-shirt among Muay Thai fighters, black with “Fighting Solves Everything” embossed in big white block letters right across the chest. Of course, this is poking fun at the idea of using our words and not our fists, talking things out, walking away, and instead saying, “Screw that, just punch them in the face!” Obnoxious t-shirts are the best, and it is a guaranteed conversation starter.

But at the same time, there is a very resounding and likely unintentional truth in the meatheadish message of the t-shirt. Muay Thai tests your entire being—it is as much physical as it is emotional and intensely intellectual. You can have the athleticism but not the technique. You can have the technique but not the fitness. You can look like a Greek statue and still freeze like a deer in the headlights once you step in the ring.

Because of this, it makes other things in life comparatively easy. To do it competitively, even at an amateur level, you need self-discipline, physical and emotional awareness, a sense of life balance, and, determination. Fight training is grindingly intense, you push your body to give absolutely everything it has while your mind simultaneously deals with the inevitability of getting into a fist fight in front of hundreds of people. Read More

Being the Girl

By Jenypher Lanthier

After another exhausting day at my day job where I was a graphic designer, which frequently involved arguing with my boss over why I refused to use the comic sans font in anything I produced, I got to the gym around 6:00 pm and was ready to spar. I had sparred before but this was one of the first organized sessions that my Kru had set up, so it was a full house. Tuesday sparring at Siam No.1 was always a broad mixture of sizes and skills. Beginners, amateurs and professionals were all grouped together in the same sweat-drenched ring. Read More

Alex Berrios trains for his July 22nd bout at Friday Night Fights – Photos

Tampa, Florida’s Alex Berrios recently traveled down to visit us at Muay Thai is Life and allowed us to take a look at part of his training camp for his match up with Rigel Balsamico at Friday Night Fights in NYC on July 22nd. Alex Berrios, who trains out of Khanomtom Muay Thai in Tampa, Florida drove down from Tampa to attend a seminar at Dynasty Martial Arts & Fitness – Kaewsamrit U.S.A. hosted by retired Muay Thai World Champion Raul Llopis. After the seminar, Alex continued his training at a private facility with Raul Llopis, UFC fighter Vagner Rocha, and Miami based professional MMA fighter Alan Arzeno.

Below are few shots we took of Alex at his recent training session: